Building Trails for the Future

Hikers venture down the current staircase at O’Neil Woods Metro Park.

What is different about building trails now compared to early years?

Shown in this black and white photo from 1968, Deer Run Trail in O’Neil Woods Metro Park followed an existing deer trail straight down the hill. Similarly, Spring Hollow Trail in Hampton Hills Metro Park shown in the accompanying photo, followed a staircase before being rerouted in 2018.

Rerouting iconic trails

A hiker heads up the stairs of Deer Run Trail. Photo by Joe Prekop.

What is “sustainable trail building?”

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Summit Metro Parks manages 15,000 acres, 16 parks, three nature centers and more than 150 miles of trails. Find more at www.summitmetroparks.org.

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Summit Metro Parks

Summit Metro Parks

Summit Metro Parks manages 15,000 acres, 16 parks, three nature centers and more than 150 miles of trails. Find more at www.summitmetroparks.org.

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